Coroner’s Inquest on UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN, 16 March 1826

A short time ago a Coroner’s Inquest was held at Parramatta on the body of one of the inmates of the Factory, and the Jury brought in a verdict of—Death by the visitation of God. Very soon after returning this verdict, some of the Jurymen became dissatisfied with it, on account of some information which had reached their ears. The Jury upon this reassembled, and brought in a second verdict—Died by starvation. This was returned to the Governor, who was not made acquainted with the former one, and his Excellency immediately ordered an investigation to be made into the state of the Factory, judging very properly that if the above verdict were well founded, there must be some extraordinary misconduct in the Superintendent.

The gentlemen, viz. the Lieutenant Governor, Mr. CARTER, and Dr. HARRIS, were requested to take upon themselves the duty of making a minute inquiry into the economy of the Factory, and to form a report for the information and satisfaction of the Governor. The above named gentlemen accordingly proceeded to Parramatta, and entered upon their office at the Factory.

After hearing all the circumstances connected with the death of the female, they came to the conclusion, that the first verdict of the Jury was the proper one, as they were satisfied that the woman died of a consumption, and that in the course of her illness she had shown every symptoms of being afflicted with that complaint. The Commissioners in a report which they had drawn up, have expressed disapprobation of some of the arrangements of the Factory;—arrangements which they do not attribute so much to the Matron or Superintendent, as to a bad system generally. They have suggested some alterations, which will,  no doubt, be acted on forthwith.

See Original:No title,” The Australian (Sydney, NSW: 1824 – 1848), Thursday 16 March 1826, p.3