Report of UNIDENTIFIED WOMEN, 13 March 1827

To the Editor of The Australian.

SIR.

Through the medium of your truly independent Journal many abuses have been rectified; and having perused one of your leading articles in the last Publication respecting the impropriety of withholding licenses from persons of respectability, I beg leave to make an observation.

On Friday last as passing through Cambridge-street, Rocks, my attention was attracted by the scraping of a fiddle and a number of children assembled around a door, when curiosity induced me to stop, where I beheld a female dancing with her clothes around her waist, a most disgusting scene (which would never have been permitted in a licensed house), and within, several of the most abject wretches who have lately been discharged from the Factory, whose names, as also that of the proprietor of the house, who has lately emerged from the walls of the gaol for keeping a disorderly house and selling without a license, I shall transmit to the Superintendent of Police, with a reference to several of the constables as to the public nuisance of the said house.

Your remarks are truly just as to granting more licenses — it would suppress a number of those illicit dealers in spirits, whose houses are the resort of the most abandoned characters, from obtaining a livelihood by those practices. It also behoves the Police to adopt the means resorted to in England with respect to those houses where dancing and drinking are going forward with a number of bad characters, for the Magistrates to authorise the constables to apprehend all such under the Vagrant Act.

VERITAS.

See Original:To the Editor of The Australian. SIR,” The Australian (Sydney, NSW: 1824 – 1848), Tuesday 13 March 1827, p.2