Police Report of JANE KINGSHAW, 30 August 1826

KINGSHAW v. Wife JANE — This was a case of matrimonial strike, and unhappily one in its leading features not at all unfrequent in this country. Defendant is a currency lass. Fifteen moons have filled their “horns” since she and the confiding, deserted forgiving, disconsolate, “stronger vessel” has joined their mutual hands, and apparently hearts, at the altar, whence many a pair had before sailed on their matrimonial cruise, some still favored by the prospering breezes of love, duty, and affection, whilst others had their course retarded amongst the shallows of strife and bickering, and all their dearest hopes, wrecked by the gales of adversity. Only a few short months previously and their wedding feast had been celebrated by dancing and drinking, and eating and singing, but now how changed—the three last months had glided away in somewhat of a less cat and dog-like nature, but before the sixteenth moon from the time of their nuptials could shew her ruddy face, “or e’er those shoes were green,” the fair or frail one packed up all the worldly goods with which her partner had endowed her, and also a part and parcel of other articles, to wit, some “marvellously foul linen,” which were entrusted to her for the purpose of being fairly rid of their very foul incumbrances [sic]. She trudged it away right merrily to Sydney, leaving her unsuspecting rib to put with his fate, as re-resignedly as his temperament would admit, and engaged as a fille de chambre. The yet loving spouse, by some natural instinct, scented her place of concealment. What will not love effect? He procured a simple warrant for her apprehension; despite of this, she continued housed, for a few weeks longer; but unluckily being once seen, and that once too often, was apprehended, sent to gaol, and, to “sum up this sad eventful story,” brought before their worships for disposal.

Plaintiff was resolute in a desire of having his wife returned to her home, but the obstinate frail one was as resolute in keeping aloof, and preferred the idea of becoming an inmate of the Factory’s drear halls, rather than returning to partake of matrimonial comforts. Here the case rests for the present, defendant being ordered to be remanded; an opportunity of altering her resoluting being thus afforded her.

* JANE KINGSHAW also recorded as JANE KINGSBURY in the follow up to this police report on 2 September 1826

See Original:POLICE INCIDENTS,” The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 – 1848), Wednesday 30 August 1826, p.3