Police Report of ANN BEDFORD, 5 April 1826

ANN BEFORD was brought up with a host of evidence accompanying her. She was accused with making use of those charms which nature had too bountifully bestowed, in captivating from the dwelling-house of Mr. GEORGE TOMLINS, sundry bank notes, silver monies, and other property.

The first to bear testimony to this elopement was Mrs. SELINA TOMLINS. She deposed that the prisoner was assigned from the factory (or nunnery) on Tuesday week to the service of Mr. JOHN BROUGHTON, a resident at Newcastle; and according to a previous arrangement, had been escorted to witness’s house, there to remain until an opportunity should occur of forwarding her to her service. On Thursday morning, she (Mrs. T.) requested this damsel to purchase some necessaries for her at the market. To this the latter consented, but did not appear until the clock had nearly told twelve. When she did return Mrs. T. was not at home. Soon after this the tardy marketer walked away, and had not since returned. Mrs. T’s. suspicions being excited from this unexpected circumstance, a looking glass drawer was examined, which exhibited “confirmation strong” of having been intermeddled with—several paper and silver dollars being minus. 

Mr THELL, who is in the habit of tending millinery by the year, inch or ell, remembered the personage in question, having come to his house on a Thursday, and inspecting some articles of finery. She eventually purchased a gown, a straw bonnett, and some other paraphernalia, amounting on the whole to two pounds eighteen and ninepence, which sum was laid down in Spanish dollars.

A—— SMART butcher, (or rather Smart, a butcher) deposed to his being present at a time when a publican in Market-street changed a twenty-dollar bank note for the damsel; and an operative jeweller had bartered a nice pair of ear-rings with her for exchange in silver at par. The prisoner was remanded.

See Original: “OFFENCES, CHARGES, &c,” The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 – 1848) Wednesday 5 April 1826, p.3