Susan Courtney

Convict woman incarcerated in the Parramatta Female Factory.


Police Reports

SUSAN COURTNEY, found illegally at large, was ordered to repair, without loss of time, to the Factory, and then and there to become an inmate of the second class.

EMANUEL MYERS, assigned to a master taylor [sic], and himself a taylor “by trade,” who had been paying his addresses to the last mentioned damsel, and which addresses she did not appear to have at all rejected, as it was said that both lived harmoniously together, as if man and wife, but without having first had imposed upon them the shackles of matrimony, next appeared to hear and receive his quantum of penance. It was love, all-pervading love—love “the disturber of high and low,” that had been busy with this unlucky tailor, and which had induced him to contribute a part and parcel of his weekly wages, towards the support of this frail and unlawfully at large protegé. For being thus accessary [sic] to her concealed and unauthorised detention from the Factory, MYERS, whose love was yet uncooled, and as sharps as a “needle,” received sentence of banishment, (Ha! banishment be merciful, say death) from the object on whom he had bestowed so much of his affections and earnings, and what was still worse, to while away ten days on the Tread Mill, before he could again “thread the needle” for his own, or his master’s benefit.

See Original:POLICE INCIDENTS,” The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 – 1848), Saturday 17 June 1826, p.3

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SUSAN COURTNEY and EMANUEL MYERS, both prisoners of the crown, were charged as follows; the female with being at large without legal authority, and the man with having harboured her in his house. SUSAN COURTNEY to the factory for 3 months, MYERS to the tread-mill for ten days.

See Original:THE POLICE,” Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW: 1803 – 1842), Saturday 17 June 1826, p.3


Lists

# Convict

# Year: 1826