Rose Brian (1814–1833)

ROSE BRIAN was an Irish convict woman tried and convicted in Dublin in 1829 for stealing clothes and sentenced to seven years transportation per Asia I (5) (1830) aged just sixteen years old. ROSE was incarcerated multiple times at the Parramatta Female Factory where she passed away. She was buried in the parish of St. John’s, Parramatta on 21 August 1833.


Names

  • Alternate: ROSE BRIEN
  • Alternate: ROSE O’BRIEN
  • Alternate: ROSE BRYAN

Timeline

  • Born: 1814, Dublin, Ireland
  • Tried and convicted: 1829, Dublin, Ireland
  • Sentenced to seven years transportation
  • Sailed to the colony of New South Wales per Asia I (5): 1829, Cork, Ireland
  • Arrived in the colony of New South Wales per Asia I (5): 13 January 1830, Port Jackson, New South Wales
  • Committed to Sydney Gaol for stealing: 7 September 1830, Sydney Gaol, Sydney, New South Wales
  • Sentenced to four months in the third class of the Factory: General Sessions, Sydney
  • Transferred from the gaol to the Factory: 10 September 1830, Parramatta Female Factory
  • Committed to Gaol for absconding from the service of Mr Milson, North Shore: 23 March 1831
  • Sentenced to one month in the third class of the Factory and to be returned to Government: 23 March 1831
  • Transferred to the Factory: 25 March 1831, Parramatta Female Factory
  • Committed to Gaol for absconding from service: 23 July 1831
  • Sentenced to three months in third class of the Factory: 1 August 1831
  • Committed to Gaol: 2 February 1832
  • Sentenced to one month in the third class of the Factory: 4 February 1832
  • Transferred from gaol to the Factory: 7 February 1832, Parramatta Female Factory
  • Died: c. 21 August 1833, Parramatta Female Factory
  • Buried: 21 August 1833, unmarked grave, parish of St. John’s, Parramatta

Burial Location

  • Unmarked grave, exact location in the parish of St. John’s, Parramatta is unknown.

Occupation

  • Nurse girl

Religion

  • Catholic

Multimedia

The small building to the left of the big blue doors was the “dead house” at the Parramatta Female Factory. Photo: Michaela Ann Cameron (2014)
The small building to the left of the big blue doors was the “dead house” at the Parramatta Female Factory. Photo: Michaela Ann Cameron (2014)

Sources

  • Irish Convicts to New South Wales, 1788–1849, (http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/cgi-bin/irish/irish.cgi, 2011), ROSE BRIAN, accessed 9 October 2018.
  • New South Wales Government, Entrance books [Sydney Gaol], NRS 2514, Reel 851, (State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia).
  • Parish Burial Registers, Textual Records, St. John’s Anglican Church Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia.

Lists

# Convict

# Irish

# Punishment: 7 years Transportation

# Ship: Asia I (5) (1830)

# Parramatta Female Factory

# Place of Death: Parramatta Female Factory

# Burial Year: 1833

# Grave: unmarked