John Murphy (1787–1828)

JOHN MURPHY was an Irish convict who was tried and convicted in 1817 in Dublin, Ireland and sentenced to fourteen years transportation per Guildford (3) (1818). By 1826, with a ticket of leave in hand, MURPHY was appointed a Parramatta constable. In July 1828, however, MURPHY died suddenly from what Surgeon CONNOLLY described as “a fit of apoplexy.”

A Juryman at the Inquest further noted that “he had frequently heard the deceased complain of having caught cold from having to do duty on the outside of the Parramatta Factory, where, if a night happen to be stormy and wet, there is at hand no covered place whereto the watchman may retire for shelter.” The media and townsfolk of Parramatta had been complaining for well over a year that they did not think the constables should be wasted at the Factory when they were needed for the protection of law-abiding people in the town. Indeed, only a month prior to MURPHY’s death there had been a complaint about the constabulary presence at the Factory. The month after MURPHY’s death, too, another constable made a formal complaint about the perils of guarding the Factory walls in the middle of winter. A correspondent in the same article reinforced the point that the constables should be protecting the town instead of the Factory women. By then, it was no longer merely the statement of a single Juryman connecting his death with his work as a constable; the journalist reported the theory of causation as a fact and a conclusive finding at the inquest: “It is not four weeks since an Inquest was holden upon the body of a Parramatta constable, whose illness and death were attributed to a cold, contracted during some night’s close watching outside of the factory walls, without a great coat.”

It is not clear, then, whether MURPHY’s death really was directly related to his duty at the Factory or whether his death was used to bolster existing arguments in favour of removing the constables from duty at the Factory.


Timeline

  • Born: 1787, Galway, Ireland
  • Tried and convicted: 1817, Dublin City, Ireland
  • Sentenced to fourteen years transportation: 1817, Dublin City, Ireland
  • Sailed to the colony of New South Wales per Guildford (3): 14 November 1817, Cork, Ireland
  • Arrived in the colony of New South Wales per Guildford (3): 1 April 1818, Port Jackson, New South Wales
  • Received Ticket of Leave: 11 November 1824
  • Appointed Constable of Parramatta: 12 December 1826, Parramatta
  • Died suddenly: 25 June 1828, gate-keepers lodge, Toll-gate, Parramatta, New South Wales
  • Coronial Inquest: 25 June 1828, Woolpack Inn, George St, Parramatta, New South Wales

Reports


Multimedia


Sources

  • New South Wales Government, Copies of letters sent within the Colony, Series: 937, Reels: 6004-6016, (State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia).
  • New South Wales Government, Main series of letters received, 1788-1825, Series: 897, Reels: 6041-6064, 6071-6072, (State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia).
  • New South Wales Government, Reports of Inquests, 1796–1824, Series: 2233, Roll: 5607, (State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia).
  • New South Wales Government, Special Bundles, 1794-1825, Series: 898, Reels: 6020-6040, 6070, Fiche: 3260-3312, (State Records Authority of New South Wales. Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia).
  • New South Wales Government, Ticket of Leave Butts, 31 Mar 1827–20 Aug 1867, Series: 12202, Item: [4/4060], Fiche: 753, (State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia).
  • Irish Convicts to New South Wales, 1788–1848, (http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/cgi-bin/irish/irish.cgi, 2011), JOHN MURPHY, accessed 3 December 2018.
  • Advertising,” The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 – 1848), Wednesday 13 December 1826, p. 2.
  • CORONER’S INQUEST,” The Australian (Sydney, NSW: 1824 – 1848), Friday 27 June 1828, p. 3.
  • No title,” The Australian (Sydney, NSW: 1824 – 1848), Friday 25 July 1828, p. 3.
  • No title,” The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), Friday 27 June 1828, p. 2.
  • Classified Advertising,” The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), Monday 21 July 1828, p. 1.

Lists

# Convict

# Trial Place: Dublin, Ireland

# Punishment: Fourteen Years Transportation

# Ship: Guildford (3) (1818)

# Factory Personnel

# Constable

# Convict Constable

# Burial Year: 1828