Isabella Simpson

Convict woman incarcerated at the Parramatta Female Factory.


Names

  • Bella Simpson

Relationships

  • Spouse of Thomas Simpson

Police Reports

NOTICE – I hereby Caution the Public not to give Credit to my Wife, ISABELLA SIMPSON, as I will not be accountable for any Debts she may contract after this Notice.

June 9th, 1824.

THOMAS SIMPSON

See Original:Classified Advertising,” Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), Thursday 10 June 1824 p.3

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A man named DARCEY, free, and a shattered frail and worn out fair one, named ISABELLA SIMPSON, were each fined 5s. to the poor; the man paid the fine, but the female was necessitated to expiate her offence by being exposed as a public spectacle in the stocks for six hours.

See Original:THE POLICE,” Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), Saturday 15 April 1826, p.2

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APRIL 18. — ISABELLA SIMPSON, free, charged and convicted of being a notorious common prostitute; to the factory for 3 months.

See Original:THE POLICE,” Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), Saturday 22 April 1826, p.2

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BELLA SIMPSON, free, convicted of an assault and of being a nuisance to the neighbourhood, by constant habits of drunkenness, riot, and disorder, and who had been before punished on similar charges, was now deemed a rogue and vagabond, and ordered as an incorrigible character to be sent to the Factory, as the house of correction, for 3 months.

See Original:POLICE REPORT,” Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), Thursday 1 September 1825, p.3

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POLICE REPORTS. SYDNEY. WEDNESDAY NOV. 1. — ISABELLA SIMPSON, a free body, who put the Messieurs the constables to more than ordinary trouble, on the preceding night, to restrain her riotous propensities, arising from her too free libations, was sentenced in the usual mulet of five shillings, for the benefit of her poorer fellow  mortals. BELLA certainly repented of her afternoon’s folly, but, according to the old adage, “repentance comes too late when all is spent,” and no dollar being forthcoming, an order was made out, whereby she was entitled to enjoy the full benefit of the sun in a certain wooden machine called the stocks, for the allotted period of two hours.

See Original:Police Reports. SYDNEY,” Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW: 1803 – 1842), Saturday 4 November 1826, p.3

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An old sinner, named ISABELLA SIMPSON, whose face resembled more of a pine-apple, than the countenance of anything human, was charged by a constable with being drunk and noisy in the pelting rain a few nights ago, and belabouring an old pall without mercy. She stated that she was not drunk but only moistened with the rain and a nobler. Ordered to dry herself for six hours in the public stocks.

See Original:EMIGRATION,” Commercial Journal and Advertiser (Sydney, NSW : 1835 – 1840), Saturday 25 August 1838, p.2


Lists

# Convict

# Second Female Factory

# Year: 1826