Hannah Deane

Convict woman incarcerated at the Parramatta Female Factory.


Relationships

  • Spouse of Thomas Deane

Police Report

HANNAH DEANE was brought before the Court, accused by her husband, THOMAS DEANE, a man whose appearance bespoke anxiety, and who, in a languid tone, set forth his complain; that he had married HANNAH and thereby given unto her the name of DEANE, now about five years since; that they had always lived happily together, until within a few months ago; that he had ever endeavoured to accommodate a mutual good understanding, and if she thought proper to take a fat pig to Sydney and sell it, thither she might go and perform their mutual desires; that he never said wrong she did; that she had, however, abandoned her home, and had taken with her a lovely babe, which had since been drowned, by carelessness of its nurse; that she had become the companion of another person; that she refused to return home; that he would forgive all her faults, and never once upbraid her with the past, and very impressively concluded with—”and there she is, and she cannot say but I always used her well.” The prisoner now addressed the Court, “He never beat me, I own; But I left him, he was poor, and could not support me; he had no tea and sugar.” BENJAMIN LONGSTREETS was called, who proved that the complainant always provided a sufficient supply of pork; had wheat in his house and was never without good corn. “Ah! but tea and sugar!” LONGSTREETS continued, “He had tea and sugar, and they always lived happily together.” The prisoner then said, in undisguised terms, that LONGSTREETS procured the tea and sugar, and that DEANE knew how he (LONGSTREETS) was required. Patiently admonished and ordered to return home, and forsake her dissolute way; “I beg to be excused, I cannot.” — Sentence, 2 months to the Factory, in 3d class.

See Original: “Police Reports. SYDNEY,” Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW: 1803 – 1842), Wednesday 29 November 1826, p.3


Sources

  • Police Reports. SYDNEY,” Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW: 1803 – 1842), Wednesday 29 November 1826, p.3

Lists

# Convict

# Second Female Factory

# Year: 1826

# Third Class