Ann Rowland (c.1810–1834)

ANN ROWLAND was a convict who was tried and convicted at the Old Bailey on 15 April 1830 for “felonious assaulting” a man and stealing money from his person along with her accomplice MARY COLLINS. Both women were sentenced to death but were “recommended to mercy on account of their youth” and given a reprieve; their death sentences were commuted to transportation for life instead. ANN ROWLAND did not live much longer anyway; she died at the Parramatta Female Factory in 1834, with a recorded age of just 26 years old. She was buried in an unmarked grave in the parish of St. John’s, Parramatta on 5 December 1834.


Timeline

  • Born: c. 1808–1810, London, England
  • Tried and convicted of violent theft alongside MARY COLLINS: 15 April 1830, Old Bailey, London, England
  • Sentenced to death; recommended to mercy: 1830, Old Bailey, London, England
  • Pardoned and sentenced commuted: 1830, Old Bailey, London, England
  • Sailed to the colony of New South Wales per Earl of Liverpool: 3 December 1830, London, England
  • Arrived in the colony of New South Wales per Earl of Liverpool: 5 April 1831, Port Jackson, New South Wales
  • Died: c. 5 December 1834, Parramatta Female Factory
  • Buried: 5 December 1834, St. John’s Parish, Parramatta

Burial Location

  • Unmarked grave, exact location in the parish of St. John’s, Parramatta unknown.

Religion

  • Protestant

Multimedia

The small building to the left of the big blue doors was the “dead house” at the Parramatta Female Factory. Photo: Michaela Ann Cameron (2014)
The small building to the left of the big blue doors was the “dead house” at the Parramatta Female Factory. Photo: Michaela Ann Cameron (2014)

Sources


Lists

# Convict

# Trial Place: Old Bailey

# Punishment: Transportation for Life

# Ship: Earl of Liverpool (1831)

# Parramatta Female Factory

# Death Place: Parramatta Female Factory

# Burial Year: 1834

# Grave: unmarked